Terms to Know

COMMON TERMS TO KNOW

 

Terms regarding Symptoms,* Behaviors, and Feelings

  • ACTIVE LISTENING: A method of listening where a person displays interest in everything his or her companion is saying and demonstrates an understanding of the other person’s thoughts or feelings.
  • AFFECTIVE FLATTENING: A person does not display an emotional reaction or exhibits an inappropriate reaction to his or her surroundings.
  • AGITATED: Feeling anxious and restless.
  • CATATONIC BEHAVIOR: Being completely inactive, like in a trance or a stupor. May emerge as a positive symptom of schizophrenia.
  • DELUSIONS: Believing strongly in ideas that aren’t true; for instance, claims that UFOs are watching your house or the CIA is able to read your mind may emerge as a positive symptom of schizophrenia.

APPROVED FOR THE TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

*Please discuss your symptoms with your healthcare professional. He or she will review your symptoms and may consult the established guidelines, which are available in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, where applicable.

 

  • DISORGANIZED BEHAVIOR: When a person behaves in a way that seems silly or unpredictable to onlookers. May appear as one of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia.
  • DISORGANIZED SPEECH: Rambling, ongoing speech that does not seem to make any sense. May appear as one of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia.
  • HALLUCINATIONS: Hearing, seeing, feeling, tasting or smelling something that isn’t actually real. Hearing is the most common one, as in hearing voices that aren’t there. Someone with schizophrenia could be seen speaking with imaginary people. May emerge as a positive symptom of schizophrenia.
  • NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS: A lack of feelings or behaviors that are usually present, like losing interest in daily activities, not feeling connected to people, lacking in feelings and/or emotions, not being able to experience as much pleasure.
  • POSITIVE SYMPTOMS: Having more feelings or behaviors that aren’t normally present, like hearing, seeing, tasting, or feeling things that others are not experiencing; believing in things that aren’t real or true; showing jumbled speech and behavior.
  • PSYCHOTIC EPISODE: When a person is unable to distinguish what’s real or unreal due to the unexpected appearance of his or her schizophrenia symptoms. Call a doctor to learn more.
  • SENSORY OVERLOAD: When a person feels overwhelmed due to too much activity that’s happening around him or her.

APPROVED FOR THE TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

*Please discuss your symptoms with your healthcare professional. He or she will review your symptoms and may consult the established guidelines, which are available in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, where applicable.

 

Terms regarding Treatments/Medications

  • ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC: A class of drugs that were created and first used in the 1990s to help control schizophrenia symptoms.
  • ATYPICAL LONG-ACTING ANTIPSYCHOTIC INJECTABLE MEDICATION: A kind of medication that’s slowly released in a person’s body, which allows for less frequent dosing, meaning the medication doesn’t have to be taken daily.
  • ORAL MEDICATION: A kind of medicine that comes in an array of forms, including: capsule, tablet, and liquid forms and is taken by mouth.
  • TYPICAL (OR FIRST GENERATION) ANTIPSYCHOTIC: A class of medication that has been helping to control schizophrenia symptoms, and has been used for more than fifty years.

General Terms

  • CAREGIVERS: Someone who takes care of a loved one, i.e., a family member or friend who needs help.
  • TREATMENT GOAL: An aim or desired result that someone would like to achieve by following their treatment plan.
  • HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL: A person with professional training in treating people suffering from schizophrenia and/or other illnesses.
  • MOTIVATION: Something that inspires someone to do something.
  • PEER SUPPORT: A group of people with schizophrenia or a group of people who take care of people with schizophrenia. They gather to support and socialize with each other because they are able to understand what one another is going through.
  • RECOVERY PROCESS: An ongoing and unique personal process of working toward achieving your treatment goals despite your illness.
  • RELAPSE: Also referred to as a setback, this happens when symptoms of schizophrenia worsen or come back after a person undergoing treatment has had control of his or her schizophrenia symptoms for a period of time.
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA: A mental illness that can affect a person’s ability to focus, think clearly, make decisions, manage feelings, and relate to others. Someone with schizophrenia may have difficulty seeing the difference between what is real and what is imagined; may be withdrawn or unresponsive in social situations; and may have trouble expressing emotions. While there is no cure, the condition can be manageable.

APPROVED FOR THE TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

*Please discuss your symptoms with your healthcare professional. He or she will review your symptoms and may consult the established guidelines, which are available in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, where applicable.

 

  • SELF-CARE (PERSONAL HYGIENE): Attention paid to personal grooming, such as bathing, brushing or combing hair, and getting dressed.
  • TREATMENT PLAN: A complete medical care plan for treating an illness that may include medication, support, and therapy.
  • TREATMENT TEAM: A Treatment Team may include doctors, nurses, social workers, case managers, psychologists, therapists, peer counselors, and caregivers.